Loft with 14′ ceilings for sale in The Crane Building

Update: This property sold Dec. 14, 2017

A beautiful heritage loft with 14′ ceilings is for sale in the Crane Building on Beatty Street, above The Dirty Apron.

#504-546 Beatty Street is listed for $1,129,000 by Paul Albrighton. The 1,031 sq ft. loft features two bedrooms and one bath, and is on the highest floor of the heritage lofts in the building.

The soaring ceiling height is accented by exposed brick walls, polished concrete floors and restored heritage windows.

There is one underground secure parking space, and the building features a dog wash station.

Photo gallery: The Crane Building loft

504-546 Beatty Street Crane Building
Exterior of The Crane Building on Beatty Street. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver loft living area
Living area. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver loft living area
View from living area. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver loft kitchen
Kitchen. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver loft kitchen
Kitchen island. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver loft kitchen
Kitchen. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver loft bedroom
Bedroom with window to living area. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver loft bedroom
Bedroom. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver loft bath
Bath. Credit: Paul Albrighton
504-546 Beatty Street Vancouver bedroom
Bedroom. Credit: Paul Albrighton

The building was converted into lofts in 2009, something which is becoming rare in the downtown core, says the listing agent.

“Developers avoid taking on these projects, and its hard to budget for, given that restoration work can change once the project commences,” says Albrighton. “There are few buildings in Vancouver left that have not been restored already, and there is not the same allowable density as a building that can be taken down for a new high-rise.”

Albrighton says he expects heritage lofts like the ones in the Crane Building to remain relatively rare.

“Given the fact that the supply of heritage buildings is limited, and no residential conversions are currently being redeveloped, the value has risen sharply, as the demand has increased without any additional new projects being added to the Downtown core,” he says.

The Crane Building was once a warehouse and commercial building where Crane toilet and sinks were made. It’s also Vancouver’s first steel-frame building, and was unique when it was first built in 1911.

The building features many restored elements including the natural brick used in 1911, original beams through the units, and in the common hallways.